An official army family and MWR Site

Army Community Service

ACS invites you into a world of education, opportunity and discovery while offering programs and services that promote self-reliance, resilience, and stability during war and peace.

View the many programs and services ACS has to offer by searching the Community Support tab.

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Army Emergency Relief (AER) Overview

Overview

Army Emergency Relief is the U.S. Army's own nonprofit organization dedicated to alleviating financial distress on the force. AER provides grants and zero-interest loans to Active Duty and Retired Soldiers and their Families. Over 4 million Soldiers supported since 1942. AER officers are conveniently located at installations around the world. Visit ArmyEmergencyRelief.org to learn more.

Education Programs

AER’s Education Program is a secondary mission to help Army Families with the costs of education. The three separate scholarship programs are:

Stateside Spouse Education Assistance Program
• Applicant must be the Spouse or widow(er) of an active duty or retired Soldier and reside in the United States. 
• Stateside applicants must be full time students. 
• First undergraduate degrees only.
• Active duty military personnel are not eligible.

Overseas Spouse Education Assistance Program Major General James Ursano Scholarship Fund for Dependent Children.

Overseas Spouse Education Assistance Program 
• Applicants must be a Spouse of an active duty Soldier assigned in Europe, Korea, Japan, or Okinawa. 
• Applicants must physically reside with the Soldier at the assigned location. 
• First undergraduate degrees only.
• Off post students are not eligible.
• Spouses may be part time or full time students.

Major General James Ursano Scholarship Fund for Dependant Children 
• Dependent children, stepchildren, or legally adopted children of Army Soldiers on active duty, retired or deceased while in active duty or retired status.

The children of Grey Area Reservists/National Guard are eligible as well.

Scholarship awards will be awarded up to half the cost of tuition. Scholarship awards are based on financial need, as evidenced by income, assets, Family size, and special circumstances.

Applications and instructions are available for all the scholarships on the AER website at https://www.armyemergencyrelief.org/resources/

AER Resources and Forms

View all AER forms. 

Army Family Action Plan

The Army Family Action Plan (AFAP) is your platform to voice quality-of-life issues, feedback, ideas, and suggestions. It’s the best way to let Army leadership know about what works, what doesn’t, and how you think problems can be resolved. We give Active and Reserve Component Soldiers, Army Civilians, Retirees, Survivors, and Family members a primary tool to help identify issues and concerns and shape your standards of living.

You can submit issues at your garrison’s Army Community Service office or to a unit Family Programs liaison. Army OneSource also facilitates AFAP issues online and makes sure your concerns get the attention they deserve. The information you submit gives Army leadership insight and helps foster a satisfied, informed, and resilient Army Community.

AFAP makes a meaningful difference. Since AFAP was created in 1983, over 698 issues have been submitted, resulting in 128 legislative changes, 186 Department of Defense or Army policy changes, and 210 improved programs or services.

Here’s a sample of AFAP results:  

  • Dedicated Special Needs Space in Child, Youth, and School Services (CYSS)
  • Distribution of Montgomery GI Bill benefits to dependents  
  • Annual Leave carryover increase from 60 to 75 days 
  • Extended educational benefits for Spouses
  • Dental and visual insurance coverage for Federal Employees
  • Medical Coverage for Activated Reserve Component Families
  • Military pay table (targeted pay raises) 
  • Military Thrift Savings Plan 
  • TRICARE for Life for eligible Retirees
  • Funding for Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers (B.O.S.S.)
  • Active Duty Enlisted Soldier Compassionate Reassignment Stabilization
  • SGLI increases
  • Minimum standards for Army Child Care
  • In-state tuition for Military Dependents

To submit an issue or suggestion, go to your local Army Community Service office or Army OneSource.

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The Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) provides comprehensive support to Family members with special needs. An Exceptional Family Member is a Family member with any physical, emotional, developmental, or intellectual disorder that requires special treatment, therapy, education, training, or counseling, and meets the eligibility criteria. EFMP pertains to active-duty Soldiers, US Army Reserve Soldiers in the Active Guard Reserve (AGR) Program, and Army National Guard AGR personnel serving under authority of 10 USC or 32 USC. Department of the Army Civilians do not enroll in the program.

EFMP takes an all-inclusive approach to coordinating military and civilian community, educational, medical, housing, and personnel services to help Soldiers and their Families with special needs. Enrollment in EFMP includes a wide array of benefits, detailed in the EFMP Benefits Fact Sheet.

EFMP enrollment does not adversely affect promotions, schools, or assignments. EFMP information is not made available to selection boards.

Soldiers with Exceptional Family Members are required to register for EFMP and keep enrollment information current. That way, Family needs will be considered during the OCONUS assignments process. If you’re eligible for EFMP services, Family members must be screened and enrolled when they accompany authorized Soldiers on OCONUS assignments. Screenings include a medical records review for all Family members and developmental screening for all children 72 months and younger. (Special education needs are considered only in assignments outside the United States. Assignments within the US and its territories are not based on the educational needs of children.)

For more information about EFMP and helpful articles about the program, look at the Enterprise EFMP site. After that, contact the installation EFMP manager at your local Army Community Service (ACS) office. To learn more about medical enrollment, see the Program Overview.

 

EFMP Resources

Here are some helpful resources for EFMP Families.

(Government Links)

  • Systems Navigators. Systems navigators are ACS EFMP staff members available on most Army installations. They assist EFMP Families with navigating through the available systems of care.​​​​
  • EFMP Newsletter. The Exceptional Advocate is the DoD’s EFMP newsletter, which includes helpful information and resources.
  • Military OneSouce. Military OneSource’s EFMP & Me tool allows Families to explore the details of EFMP benefits and processes.
  • DirectSTEP. DirectSTEP® eCourses are available for free to Soldiers and Family Members, Army EFMP staff, and Special Education staff associated with teaching military children. DirectSTEP® eCourses teach staff, parents, and educators how to handle critical education issues to obtain positive outcomes.
  • Respite Care Support. The Army’s Respite Care Support services provide a temporary rest period for Family members responsible for regular care of persons with disabilities. Care may be provided in the EFM respite care user’s home.

(Non-Government Links, No Endorsement Implied)

  • Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR). CPIR serves as a central resource of information and products to the community of Parent Training Information (PTI) Centers and Community Parent Resource Centers, so they can focus their efforts on serving Families of children with disabilities. 
  • American Camp Association (ACA). The ACA is a community of camp professionals who join together to share their knowledge and experience and ensure the quality of camp programs, including those for Exceptional Family Members.

 

 

Want to take charge of your finances? The Army's Financial Readiness Program (FRP) and Consumer Advocacy Services can help with comprehensive educational and counseling programs. Learn about debt, consumer advocacy and protection, money management, credit, financial planning, insurance, and consumer issues. Through classroom training and individual counseling, participants can learn how to save and invest money, establish savings goals, eliminate debt, and save for emergencies.

 

We offer:

  • Financial Readiness Program (FRP). FRP provides comprehensive educational and counseling programs in personal financial readiness. The program covers indebtedness, consumer advocacy and protection, money management, credit, financial planning, insurance, and consumer issues. Other services offered include mandatory financial literacy, financial planning for transitioning Soldiers, financial counseling for deployed Soldiers and their Families, and the Department of Defense Family Subsistence Supplemental Allowance Program.
     
  • Army Emergency Relief (AER). AER is the US Army's own nonprofit organization dedicated to alleviating financial distress in the force. AER provides grants and zero-interest loans to active-duty and retired Soldiers and their Families. AER has supported over 4 million Soldiers since 1942. AER offices are conveniently located at installations around the world. Visit ArmyEmergencyRelief.org to learn more.
     
  • Online Support and Education. Go to Financial Frontline for self-service financial literacy education and help.

 

Here are some other financial resources for Soldiers and their Families:


(Government Links)

  • Thrift Savings Plan (TSP). The TSP is a federal government-sponsored retirement savings and investment plan available to both federal civilian employees and members of the uniformed services. The TSP offers the same type of savings and tax benefits that many private corporations offer their employees under 401(k) plans. The retirement income a TSP account provides will depend on working-year contributions and the earnings on those contributions. Learn more at the official Thrift Savings Plan website.

 

(Non-Government Links, No Endorsement Implied)

  • Better Business Bureau (BBB) Military Line. The BBB Military Line provides free resources to our military communities in the areas of financial literacy and consumer protection through the efforts of 112 BBBs across the US. Visit the BBB Military Line to learn more.

 

Building Strong and Resilient Military Families by Promoting Positive Parent-Child Relationships

The Army’s New Parent Support Program helps Soldiers and Family members who are expecting a child or have a child or children up to 3 years of age build strong, resilient military Families. Through a variety of supportive services including home visits, support groups, and parenting classes, the NPSP teaches ways to cope with stress, isolation, military transitions such as deployments and post-deployment reunions, and the everyday demands of parenthood. Please contact your Installation Army Community Service Center, Family Advocacy Program for more information and the opportunity to speak with an NPSP Staff Member.

 

NPSP Helpful Links

 

Parenting Resources

 

Parenting Organizations

 

NPSP: Frequently Asked Questions

 

Q: Who is eligible?

A: All Soldiers and Family members expecting a child or with children from birth to 3 years are eligible to participate free of charge in NPSP services. Also eligible are activated Reservists, Retirees, and their Families.

 

Q: Who are the NPSP staff?

A: The NPSP staff are licensed clinical social workers (LCSWs) or registered nurses (RNs) who have extensive experience working with Families and young children and are sensitive to the unique challenges faced by military Families. Other staff members may include Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists (LMFTs) who may also serve as home visitors and administrative support staff.

 

Q: What can the NPSP do for me?

A: The NPSP offers a variety of programs and services to support you and your Family in becoming and staying strong and resilient, including:

Home Visits: NPSP home visitors provide information and guidance regarding child development and answer questions related to your baby, young children, Family relationships and parenting techniques. Home visitors provide education on a variety of topics, such as infant sleeping, breastfeeding, nutrition, potty training, age-appropriate discipline, developmental screenings, sibling rivalry, stress management, deployment/reunion challenges, time management, parental self-care and other topics. Visits may be provided in the comfort of your home or in an NPSP office setting. Home visits may be scheduled at your convenience.

Playgroups:  Playgroups allow moms, dads, and their children to join other young children and their parents in a child-centered setting for a few hours each week for children to interact and learn through play. The activity also provides an opportunity for parents to network, learn and share experiences with each other and NPSP staff regarding the parenting of young children in a military environment. During the group setting, the NPSP staff may focus on nurturing activities, interpersonal skill building exercises, role modeling, and age-appropriate exercises that involve parents and their children. Playgroups may bring military Families with young children together, combating the isolation that many parents may feel. They are open to all military Families with young children at no cost.

Parenting Classes: NPSP offers scheduled parenting classes and support groups, which may differ by location, on a variety of topics, including child development, proper nutrition, well-baby care, Shaken Baby Syndrome, “The Period of Purple Crying,” safe infant sleeping awareness, Boot Camp for Dads, infant massage, post-partum depression, child and home safety, discipline, stress management, problem solving, decision making, parenting during military transitions, and blended Families.

 

Q: Are the services confidential?

A: Yes, information shared with NPSP home visitors is confidential. However, exceptions do exist to protect you, your children, and others’ safety. As licensed professionals, all NPSP home visitors have a duty to warn if they believe an individual may harm themselves or others. NPSP home visitors are also mandated reporters of child abuse. As such, they must report any suspicion of child abuse and/or neglect to the appropriate resources. During your first meeting with your NPSP home visitor, you are encouraged to discuss confidentiality, and these exceptions, with your home visitor.

 

Q: How do we enroll?

A: Please contact your installation Army Community Service (ACS), Family Advocacy Program, New Parent Support Program office to enroll in services today. You can also call Military OneSource for more information and referrals:

Relocation Readiness Program

Moving is a part of life for Soldiers, civilian government employees and their Families. The Army Community Service Relocation Readiness Program is here to help with a comprehensive support system, whether it’s your first move or the last of many. We have all kinds of information and resources to help you and your family navigate your next military move.

Your first stop should be your local Army Community Service Family center to meet with a Relocation Readiness Program Manager who can get you started.

What all does Fort Leonard Wood and the surrounding communities offer? Check out this video to find out!

*Relocation Readiness purposes only. No federal endorsement implied. 

SHARP (Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention Program)

The Armed Forces’ Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention (SHARP) Program is the Armed Forces’ integrated, proactive effort to end the crimes of sexual harassment and sexual assault within our ranks. Sexual harassment and sexual assault have no place in the Armed Forces. If you have been the victim of sexual harassment or sexual assault, you have a voice, you have rights, and we’re here to help.

 

The Armed Forces’ SHARP Program also:

  • Permeates the Armed Forces structure from the Pentagon down to the individual Soldier level.
  • Has full-time military and civilian staff at the brigade level and higher.
  • Promotes cultural change across the Armed Forces, with a vision toward a culture of dignity and respect in which Soldiers, Civilians and Family Members intervene in potential situations that could result in sexual harassment and sexual assault to protect one another.
  • Includes a comprehensive effort to educate leaders and Soldiers about sexual harassment and sexual assault.
  • Employs a concrete training program that teaches Soldiers and Civilians to be alert to serial offender tactics, to intervene to stop incidents and disrupt offenders, and where and how to seek help.
  • Provides commanders with the essential resources, education, and training they need to succeed in bringing an end to sexual harassment and sexual assault within their units and build a command culture in which these crimes are not tolerated.

 

We have certified Sexual Assault Response Coordinators (SARCs) and Victim Advocates (VAs) available 24/7 to help with reporting, victim support, prevention, training, and awareness efforts.

For more information about SHARP, visit sexualassault.army.mil.

 

More Helpful Resources:

  • U.S. Armed Forces Sexual Assault Prevention & Response Program
  • U.S. DoD Sexual Assault Prevention & Response
  • National Sexual Assault Hotline: +1 (800)656-HOPE (4673) 
  • Center for Sex Offender Management 
  • Men Can Stop Rape +1(202) 265-6530
  • National Center on Domestic & Sexual Violence (military resources) +1 (512)407-9020 
  • National Sexual Violence Resource Center +1 (877)739-3895
  • Rape Abuse & Incest National Network +1 (800)656-4673 ext. 3 
  • Rape & Sexual Assault: Reporting to Police & Medical Attention, 1992-2000, Bureau of Justice Statistics, US DoJ
  • Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner/Sexual Assault Response Team
  • Sexual Assault State Coalitions
Soldier and Family Assistance Center

The Soldier and Family Assistance Center (SFAC) is a one-stop location built to equip and aid Wounded, Ill, and Injured Soldiers who are assigned or attached to Warrior Transition Units. SFAC services help these Soldiers make life-changing decisions as they transition back to duty or on to civilian life. We strive to deliver tailored, compassionate, and coordinated transitional services designed to promote self-reliance, wellness, and healing during their medical recuperation and transition. The facilities provide a warm, relaxed environment where Soldiers and their Families can gather to foster physical, spiritual, and mental healing.

 

The SFAC coordinates and refers services like:

  • Information and Referral assistance: Provides reception services and general orientation.
  • Military Personnel Services: Help coordinate military records and information, as well as identification cards and records management, where available.
  • Entitlement and Benefits services: Help with education plans, benefits review, Family member education support, and other career-enhancing information.
  • Soldier for Life: A Transition Assistance Program that supports mandatory Transition requirements and services.
  • Financial Counseling: Provides credit management, budget development, consumer information and awareness, financial counseling and assistance. It also provides emergency financial assistance in the form of loans or grants, and monetary assistance for undergraduate education for dependent children.
  • Substance Abuse information and referral for Family members.
  • Coordination of Legal and Pastoral Services.
  • Help to find lodging resources for Family members.
  • Child Care Referral provides registration services for all Child, Youth, and School Services programs including Sports and Family Child Care (FCC) homes.
  • Coordination with Army Reserve, National Guard, and State and Local Agencies.

If you’d like more information or need help, contact an SFAC Representative.

Wounded, Ill, and Injured Soldiers and their Families expect and deserve the very best care and leadership from America’s Army.

 

 

Survivor Outreach Services (SOS) provides long-term support to surviving Families of fallen Soldiers. Our goal is to reassure survivors that they remain valued members of the Army Family.

The SOS program connects you with people who can help. Our services include grief counseling, financial counseling, benefits coordination, support groups, and garrison and surrounding area events.

After a loved one is lost, unresolved issues or questions may surface months or years afterward. The Army is dedicated to fulfilling its promise by providing support to surviving Families. Our financial counselors aid surviving Families through investment and estate planning education, and our support coordinators provide long-term support. SOS can help you navigate the details.

SOS delivers services at garrisons and communities closest to where Families live. Regardless of your loved one’s component or branch, duty status, location, or manner of death, SOS will provide dedicated outreach and support when and as long as you desire.

SOS also honors survivors with Gold Star and Next of Kin lapel buttons. They are symbols of your sacrifice, widely recognized throughout the country. Find more about Gold Star and Next of Kin lapel buttons here.

The Gold Star and Surviving Family Member (GSSFM) Representative is the Army advocate for surviving Family members – and any survivor can contact an Army GSSFM Representative directly any time for any reason. These representatives are available to provide support and address complaints by spouses and other dependents of deceased service members regarding casualty assistance or receipt of benefits authorized by law. If you have questions or concerns about casualty assistance or receipt of benefits, your GSSFM Representative can help.

You can contact a GSSFM representative at +1(833) 313-1960 or usarmy.jbsa.imcom-hq.mbx.sos-survivor-advocate@army.mil.

 

Find more resources for survivors here.

The Victim Advocacy Program (VAP) provides emergency and follow-up support services to adult victims of domestic abuse. Advocacy services are available to Service members, their current or former spouses, an individual with whom the Service member shares a child, and significant others of Service members who live together. Our services are available twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week.

Our trained professionals are here for crisis response, information on reporting options, medical treatment options, law enforcement’s response, emergency services, safety planning, obtaining military and civilian protective orders, and accompaniment to medical forensic exams and medical appointments, as well as accompaniment to court for orders of protection hearings and trials. Advocates work closely with their civilian counterparts and ensure a personal and smooth transition for victims who do not qualify for ongoing advocacy services within the military community.

If you need help or want more information, contact the Victim Advocacy Program Manager at your local Army Community Service Center.

Reporting Options

The Army is fully committed to ensuring victims of domestic abuse are protected; treated with dignity and respect; and provided support, advocacy and care. The Army strongly supports effective command awareness and prevention programs, and holding offenders accountable.

There are two types of reporting options: Restricted Reporting and Unrestricted Reporting. Personnel should report all suspected cases of domestic abuse promptly, which quickly activates victim services and accountability actions. However, we understand things might not always work that way. Victims might need medical attention or victim services without command or a law enforcement response. Therefore, the Army has implemented a Restricted Reporting Option for victims to confidentially disclose allegations of abuse and receive needed medical treatment and services.

Restricted Reporting

Allows someone who meets VAP criteria and who is experiencing violence in his/her relationship to confidentially disclose the abuse to a Victim Advocate, a Victim Advocate Supervisor, or a Healthcare Provider. When an individual chooses a restricted report, law enforcement is not involved and there is no investigation of the abuse. In addition, the Soldier’s Command is not notified of the abuse and is unable to offer assistance and protection.

The restricted reporting option allows an individual to receive medical treatment, advocacy services and clinical and pastoral counseling. This option allows one to receive needed services, control the release of his/her personal information, and time to consider his/her options.

Under this reporting option, the offender is not held accountable and the abuse may continue. If an assessment reveals a high risk for future injury, a restricted report may not be granted.

Unrestricted Reporting

Victims of domestic abuse who want to pursue an official investigation of an incident should report the abuse to law enforcement, or the alleged offender’s Commander. The unrestricted reporting option provides a victim with the widest array of services available including but not limited to command involvement, law enforcement involvement, medical treatment, advocacy services, and counseling services.

Not all incidents of domestic abuse are the same, and each person who experiences domestic abuse handles the situation differently.

Command Response

Commanders play an integral part in ensuring the safety, health, and well being of our Army Families. Commanders who learn of an incident of domestic abuse are required to notify law enforcement.

Victim’s Rights

  • The right to be treated with fairness and with respect for your dignity and privacy.
  • The right to be reasonably protected from the accused offender.
  • The right to be notified of court proceedings.
  • The right to be present at all public court proceedings related to the offense, unless the court determines that your testimony would be materially affected if you, as the victim, heard other testimony at trial.
  • The right to confer with the attorney for the government in the case; the right to available restitution; the right to information about the conviction, sentencing, imprisonment, and release of the offender.

Safety Planning

A violent relationship puts you and your children at risk for injury and even death. Developing a safety plan tailored to meet the needs of your family will enable you get out of a potentially dangerous situation. If your children are old enough, mature enough, or even responsible enough to assist you during a violent or potentially violent episode of domestic abuse, you may consider including them in your plan to keep everyone safe. A good safety plan considers which steps to take if you choose to stay in the relationship or if you choose to leave.

Here are some tips during the explosive phase of domestic abuse:

  • Move to a room with easy access to an exit. Don't go to the kitchen, bathroom or near possible weapons.
  • Know the quickest route out of your home. Practice escaping that way.
  • Know the quickest route out of your workplace. Practice escaping that way. Domestic violence does not just occur in your home.
  • Pack a bag and have it ready. Keep it hidden but make it easy to grab quickly.
  • Tell your neighbors about your abuse and ask them to call the police when they hear a disturbance.
  • Have a code word to use with your kids, family and friends. They will know to call the police and get you help.
  • Know where you are going to go, if you ever have to leave.
  • Use your instincts.
  • You have the right to protect yourself and your children.

Develop a Safety Plan

Protection Orders

Military Protection Orders (MPO)
Unit Commanders may issue a Military Protective Order (MPO) to ensure the safety of service members, family members, and other individuals from the threat of domestic violence. An MPO is a written lawful order issued by a commander that orders a Soldier to avoid contact with his or her spouse or children. The commander should provide a written copy of the order within 24 hours of its issuance to the protected person, the Military Police and civilian law enforcement. An individual should report violations of the MPO to law enforcement.

Civilian Protection Orders (CPO)
A Civilian Order of Protection is an order signed by a Judge that directs an individual to stop abusing, stalking, harassing and/or committing acts of sexual violence against an individual. An individual may file a CPO against current or former spouse, someone that an individual shares a child in common, an individual with whom you have shared a residence with, someone related to you by blood or marriage or someone with whom you have dated or had intimate relations.

National Resources

  • United States Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women
  • National Center on Domestic and Sexual Violence
  • Stalking Resource Center
  • Statewide directory for laws, courts, emergency shelters, orders of protection
  • Battered Women's Justice Project
  • The Family Violence Prevention Fund
  • Women's Justice Center– Also is Spanish
  • Mind, Body, Spirit Empowered - Materials translated into many languages
  • Marriage and Equality – Materials translated into many languages

Victims of domestic violence and sexual abuse have round-the-clock access to services, including emergency assistance, information, referrals, and ongoing support in accessing medical, behavioral health, legal, and law enforcement services on and off garrisons. Victim Advocates will discuss the option of restricted and unrestricted reports.

 

Domestic Violence Hotlines

 

All Army installations have a 24/7 Family Advocacy Program (FAP) Domestic Abuse Victim Advocacy Hotline. 

 

 

Domestic Abuse Victim Advocacy Program

Standing Against Abuse Together

 

The Army’s Domestic Abuse Victim Advocacy Program provides comprehensive assistance and support to victims of domestic abuse, including crisis intervention, risk assessment, safety planning, assistance securing medical treatment, information on legal rights and proceedings, and referrals to military and civilian shelters and other resources available to victims. Child advocacy services are provided to non-offending parent/guardians of children when directed by the FAP or by a judge.

 

What is a Domestic Abuse Victim Advocate (DAVA)?

Domestic Abuse Victim Advocates (DAVAs) are trained professionals who provide non-clinical advocacy services and support to Soldiers and Family members experiencing domestic abuse. DAVAs are on call 24/7 to provide immediate assistance, safety planning, non-judgmental support, and information on available resources.

 

What is Domestic Abuse?

Domestic abuse is a pattern of behavior resulting in emotional/psychological harm, economic control, and/or interference with personal liberty. The abuser could be a current or former spouse, someone you share a child with, or a current or former intimate partner you’ve shared a home with. Domestic abuse is a crime. So is violating a protective order. 

 

 

Domestic Abuse Victim Advocates can

  • Provide crisis intervention and support 24/7/365
  • Help file restricted and unrestricted reports
  • Talk with you about how safe you are and plan for emergencies
  • Give information on temporary financial support and other benefits to victims when the offender is separated from the military
  • Coordinate emergency services, including transportation, housing, and food
  • Assist in obtaining protective orders
  • Accompany you throughout the medical, investigative, and legal processes
  • Represent your interests through on-post processes
  • Offer information and referral to medical, legal, counseling, and other resources

 

How to Keep Yourself Safe

 

You can take steps to keep yourself and your children safe, and you can prepare to leave an abusive partner. Here are things to consider.

 

What Should I Do If I Am Thinking About Leaving My Abusive Partner?

 

Think about the following:

  • Several places you could go if you leave your home
  • People who might help you if possible, leave a bag of necessities at their house
  • Getting a cell phone
  • Opening a bank account/credit card in your name
  • How you might leave
  • How to take your children with you safely

 

Take the following items with you, if possible:

  • Children
  • Money
  • Keys to car, house, work
  • Extra clothes
  • Medicine
  • Important papers for you and your children
  • Birth Certificates
  • Social security cards
  • School and medical records
  • Checkbooks, credit cards
  • Driver’s license
  • Car registration
  • Welfare identification
  • Passports, green cards, work permits
  • Lease/rental agreement
  • Mortgage payment book, unpaid bills
  • Insurance papers
  • Military Protective Order (MPO)/Civilian Protective Order (CPO), divorce papers, custody papers
  • Address book
  • Pictures, jewelry, sentimental items
  • Items for your children (toys, blankets, etc.)

 

How Can I Keep Myself Safe At Work?

  • Keep a copy of your MPO/CPO at work
  • Give a picture of the abuser to security and friends at work
  • Tell your supervisors – see if they can make it harder for the abuser to find you
  • Don’t go to lunch alone
  • Ask a security guard to walk you to your car or to the bus
  • If the abuser contacts you at work, save voicemails and e-mails

 

What Can I Do to Keep Myself Safe If I Have Left My Abuser?

  • Get a cell phone.
  • Get a MPO/CPO.  Keep a copy with you at all times.  Give a copy to the police, your children’s caregivers, schools, and your boss.
  • Change the locks.
  • Install a security system and outside lights.
  • Change your number to be unlisted.
  • Use an answering machine/voicemail to screen calls.
  • Tell friends and neighbors your abuser no longer lives with you.  Ask them to call the police if they see your abuser outside or near your home.
  • Tell someone at work what has happened.
  • Try not to use the same stores, banks, or businesses that you did when you were with your abuser.
  • Find a safe way to speak with your abuser, if necessary.
  • Take a self-defense course.
  • Go over your safety plan.
ACS Directory
ACS Program Phone Number
Army Emergency Relief +1 (573)596-3154
Army Family Action Plan +1 (573)596-0195
Army Volunteer Corps +1 (573)596-0613
Exceptional Family Member Program +1 (573)596-2784
Family Advocacy Program +1 (573)596-4274
Financial Readiness +1 (573)596-2078
New Parent Support Program +1 (573)596-5300
Relocation Readiness Program +1 (573)596-4950
Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention Program +1 (573)596-0212
Special Needs Accommodation Process +1 (573)596-0212
Soldier and Family Assistance Center +1 (573)596-0212
Survivor Outreach Services +1 (573)596-0195
Victim Advocacy Program +1 (573)596-0212

More Community Support

Bundles of Joy

Feb 6 2 pm - 4 pm
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Let's Talk - a Group for New Moms

Feb 7 9 am - 10 am
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Anger Management

Feb 8 12 pm - 1:30 pm

Anger Management

Feb 8 12 pm - 1:30 pm
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Stress Management

Feb 8 2 pm - 3:30 pm

Mock Board

Feb 8 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
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Women's Basic Self Defense Classes

Sessions on 4 & 11 February. 

Feb 11 9 am - 2:30 pm
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Women's Basic Self Defense Classes

Sessions on 4 & 11 February. 

Feb 11 9 am - 2:30 pm
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Walk & Talk with New Parent Support Group

Feb 14 8:30 am - 9:30 am

Right Arm Night

Feb 24 4 pm - 5 pm
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Sponsorship Training

First Thursday of every month! 

Mar 2 8 am - 9 am
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Sponsorship Training

First Thursday of every month! 

Mar 2 8 am - 9 am